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NATURAL VS ORGANIC: WHAT’S THE DIFFERENCE?

NATURAL VS ORGANIC:

WHAT’S THE DIFFERENCE?

NATURAL VS ORGANIC:

WHAT’S THE

DIFFERENCE?

Caveman

The words “Natural” and “Organic” show up all over the place, but when it comes to Natural vs. Organic:

What’s the difference?

Well for starters, while both are commonly found on labels, “natural” refers to ingredients, while “organic” refers to ingredients and the way they’re farmed, which goes all the way back to...

Caveman
Caveman
10,000 BC

When the Agricultural Revolution first broke out

When early humans began developing methods of irrigating, cultivating, and harvesting food from the land.

While the crops themselves could indeed be considered “natural” these early farming methods would not necessarily be considered “organic” by today’s standards.

19TH CENTURY

This initial agriculture-as-usual evolved for thousands of years until around the 19th Century and the start of the industrial revolution when agriculture began to increasingly rely on chemistry and mechanization to mass produce food on a scale never before seen.

1930s

Here in the United States, by the 1930s, voices began to emerge calling for an “organic” farming movement.

After World War II, the US saw the emergence of various groups dedicated to certifying organic farms–aka farms that adhere to a specific set of criteria concerning seed usage, crop rotation, pest control, and other factors.

2000s

As consumer demand for organic foods grew, regulation and best practices continued to be refined and in the early 2000s, the USDA (that’s the United States Department of Agriculture) created a national standard for what qualifies as “organic”.

Meanwhile, “natural” remained a good-faith term that meant a given product was free of synthetic additives.

2000s

In the 2000s, a series of class-action lawsuits claimed that the term “natural” was misleading, leading to an industry-wide trend steering away from using the claim on many products.

TODAY

Manufacturers continue to employ a variety of farming and production techniques.

That’s why Campbell’s has 9 plants equipped to handle organic certified production while also continuing to develop conventional agriculture methods that support less waste, greater biodiversity, and higher overall sustainability.